Walmart's Latest Chinese Food Scandal: Diluting Ass With Fox

"We are deeply sorry for this whole affair," said Wal-Mart's China president after the world's largest retailer recalled donkey meat sold at some outlets in China after tests showed the product contained the DNA of other animals - including fox. "It is a deep lesson (for us) that we need to continue to increase investment in supplier management," repeat-offender Wal-Mart added as Reuters reports the tainted "five-spice" donkey meat may mean "wealthy shoppers will start to lose the trust [in Wal-Mart's brand] they had before." Donkey meat is a popular snack in some areas of China, but as one bemused customer noted, oddly, "Isn't fox meat more expensive than donkey meat anyway?"


 


Via Reuters,








Wal-Mart Stores Inc, the world's largest retailer, has recalled donkey meat sold at some outlets in China after tests showed the product contained the DNA of other animals, the U.S. company said.


 


Wal-Mart will reimburse customers who bought the tainted "Five Spice" donkey meat and is helping local food and industry agencies in eastern Shandong province investigate its Chinese supplier, it said late on Wednesday in official posts on China's Twitter-like Weibo. The Shandong Food and Drug Administration earlier said the product contained fox meat.


 


The scandal could dent Wal-Mart's reputation for quality in China's $1 trillion food and grocery market where it plans to open 110 new stores in the next few years.


 


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This is another hit on Wal-Mart's brand, meaning wealthy shoppers will start to lose the trust they had before," said Shaun Rein, Shanghai-based managing director of China Market Research (CMR) Group. CMR estimates Wal-Mart's market share fell from 7.5 percent to 5.2 percent over the last three years.


 


Donkey meat is a popular snack in some areas of China


 


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"We are deeply sorry for this whole affair," said Wal-Mart's China president and CEO, Greg Foran. "It is a deep lesson (for us) that we need to continue to increase investment in supplier management."


 


The U.S. retailer has had a troubled past in China. In 2011, China fined Wal-Mart, along with Carrefour, a combined 9.5 million yuan ($1.57 million) for manipulating product prices. Wal-Mart was also fined that year in China for selling duck meat past its expiry date.


 


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"Isn't fox meat more expensive than donkey meat anyway?" asked one bemused user.


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